Reviews for The Forgotten Writer: A Tribute To Lovecraft
Red Ravennot logged in chapter 1 . 7/26/2011
Although I would like to read the Cthulhu Mythos,the way it's written makes my brain go fuzzy.
TitanWolf chapter 1 . 12/3/2009
don't forget about Robert E. Howard, he used Lovecraft themes in Conan The Barbarian.
Arej chapter 1 . 9/24/2005
Well. I had no idea this man existed. But hearing of this, just of the things he did, the people he influenced, and the ideas he had, make me want to find his work and read like a crazy person. Wow. I am blown away.

BB- Arej
Formerly chapter 1 . 5/27/2005
Lovecraft was actually not bedridden his whole life. He traveled a bit, although he always loved the Providence of his youth, and the woman he married didn't especially hate him. Another thing: a lot of his fishlike creatures were inspired by engravings on Mayan ruins - some really horrible things. Look at the story Dagon, that's what he was talking about.

Lovecraft is amazing. His imagination was superior to that of any modern horror writer. But he was an awful technical writer. It's not good when you describe a thing as "loathsome, hideously misshapen and unnamable; a putrescent horror from the deep," or something like that - purple prose is bad, and Lovecraft did a lot of it. You should address his flaws too.
yay chapter 1 . 3/8/2005
CTHULHU!
tentacle chapter 1 . 2/9/2005
when i write i feel him beside me.
Haku chapter 1 . 11/4/2004
Just as a (very) late note...you probably knew this, but in case you didn't, Lovecraft was also an influence on a piece of Alan Moore's "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen", and counted a great deal in Mike Mignola's "Hellboy".
Salvador Edlin chapter 1 . 10/25/2004
Great work! I'm a fan of HPL as well. He certainly left an immense body of work that has influenced writers today.
Aaron Tilmeran chapter 1 . 6/21/2004
Other than a few grammatical things, I didn't notice much to nitpick on. It's good to know that one of my favorite authors, Lovecraft, is not forgotten in this day and age.
D.J. Bitter chapter 1 . 9/11/2003
Wow, really well written and concise. I have read the works of Lovecraft and I find that he is very forgotten. It is interesting that you mentioned Stephen King, cause in his "On Writing" book, he mentions Lovecraft several times as an example. Interesting.

Cheers and Kudos!
RoseRed chapter 1 . 9/5/2003
I have heard about Lovecraft being such a big influence on other authors and I've seen some his books in my brother's collection, but unfortunately,I've never read any of his books. Thank you for writing this, he and his books sound fascinating and I'm looking forward to start reading his works.
Tiefling chapter 1 . 9/4/2003
He's not quite forgotten yet! I'm a big fan, though it was tricky tracking down all his anthologies.

The role playing game 'The Call of Cthulu' which introduces many young gamer folk, like myself, to his ideas. It remains pretty true to the spirit of his writing, and is itself quite scary and in depth, so I wouldn't call it trivial. 'Cults Across America', a board game in which the players compete to amass an army of cultists to take over the U.S.A, using various famous people like the Pope and the president as pawns, is trivial. Fun, though.

There is also a character called 'Karl Cthulu' in the comic 'Gloom Cookie'

I have a copy of the Necronomicon (though not bound in human skin) and a fluffy Cthulu doll to remind me that all this stuff is made up if I scare myself too much reading it late at night.

Kudos on this tribute. The great man deserves it.
Mbwun chapter 1 . 9/4/2003
I think the reason he's not very exposed is that no one really reads books from the '20s unless the title begins with "The", ends with "Gatsby," and has "Great" somewhere in the middle. People tend to look for books on the 'New' shelf in Barnes & Noble, or wherever you happen to shop for bookage.

You certainly have me interested, though. I'm wondering if you might like to email me, let me know where I should start with the Lovecraft stuff.

He Who Walks On All Fours

PS - Ah, the scary-as-hell works of Preston and Child...