The paradelle is one of the more demanding French fixed forms, first appearing in the langua d'oc love poetry of the eleventh century. It is a poem of four six-line stanzas in which the first and second lines, as well at the third and fourth lines of the first three stanzas, must be identical. The fifth and sixth lines, which traditionally resolve the stanza, must use all the words from the preceding lines and only those words. Similarly, the final stanza must use every word from all the preceding stanzas and only those words.

-- excerpted from Billy Collins' book of poetry, Sailing Alone around the Room.

a life for his hands.

i dream of a life that doesn't exist,
i dream of a life that doesn't exist.
hoping for something beautiful and new,
hoping for something beautiful and new.
hoping a dream, i exist of a new life
beautiful, for something that doesn't.

he touches me through my heart and i fall,
he touches me through my heart and i fall.
grasping for his hands and finding nothing,
grasping for his hands and finding nothing.
i, grasping, fall, and his heart touches me
he through my nothing and finding for hands.

he is my guiding star and i am his,
he is my guiding star and i am his.
i am finding my way back to his side,
i am finding my way back to his side.
i am my way back to his side and his,
and i am guding he to finding star.

i dream of something beautiful for he.
he doesn't exist, guiding, grasping me,
hoping that i fall and am finding his heart.
a life for his hands and nothing is new.
his touches finding my back and i am
through my star and my way and side.