Introduction to The Lay of Orelleos

This poem is a small part of my long-term goal of creating my own mythology. It currently consists of the first song of the Lay of Orelleos and the completed poem King Bill. It is unplanned, for the most part, and is only based on the limits of my imagination and the creation of a fantasy universe that is full of the legends and stories that I would most love.

This venture is also an exploration into an area of poetry which I do not often visit: poems with a fixed form and rhyme scheme. The point of this addendum is primarily to the form of this poem, as it is quite complicated.

Structurally, this piece consists of a number of songs (indicated by the chapter number), which are split into verses. The beginning of each verse is indicated by two dashed lines, and every verse contains a set of three stanzas; each of these contain five lines.


The meter of the poem, compared to the rhyme, is quite simple. It repeats once each verse. All lines are iambic, and the meter in each line is shown below:

--
Pentameter
Diameter
Pentameter
Pentameter
Diameter

Pentameter
Triameter
Pentameter
Pentameter
Triameter

Pentameter
Tetrameter
Pentameter
Pentameter
Tetrameter
--

That same form of meter repeats throughout all verses and songs (chapters) of the poem.


The rhyme of the poem, however, is much more complicated, and often determined by a previous verse. Read on for a detailed explanation.

The most explainable rhyme in the poem is the fifth line of each stanza in a verse. These lines all rhyme.

Lines two and three of each stanza rhyme. These rhymes are new at every stanza, and are not to be repeated in any one song.

Line one of each stanza in a given verse rhymes with lines two and three of the preceding stanza. This is observed through the end of a given song.

The most complicated rhyme scheme exists in line four of each stanza. At the end of every verse, line 4 is promoted - i.e. the rhyme of line 4 of verse 1, stanza 3, becomes the rhyme of line 4 in verse 2, stanza 2; the rhyme of line 4 of verse 1, stanza 2, becomes the rhyme of line 4 in verse 2, stanza 1; a new rhyme is introduced in line 4 of stanza 3.

At the beginning of each new song (chapter), the rhyme scheme is refreshed, and rhymes are reused at the author's desire.

Feel free to PM the author if there is any confusion surrounding the explanation of the rhyme scheme.