How to Grow Your Very Own Nerd

If you are reading this manual, you are almost certainly a nerd, interested in raising a child to be every bit as socially incompetent as yourself — an admirable aspiration. Given this fact, it is probably best to begin, gently, with a caveat that no nerd wants to hear: This is not an exact science. Surely that statement makes you want to tear your nerdy hair out and rant and rave that "Yes, it can be broken down into neat little categories with clever little labels! It can and it must!" But never fear. There are some basics you should follow, and when the going gets tough, just remember: "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. Or the one."

That quote actually has nothing whatsoever to do with the topic at hand, but it does tend to sound quite knowing and impressive in almost any situation. Like, "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die." Absolutely useless in normal conversation, but still deliciously quotable. Lines any nerd should know.

Which is as good a place as any to start.

Tip #1: Show the little guy some movies. Make that, lots and lots of movies. Quote your favorite lines to him until he starts quoting them back or threatens to bash your head in with a rock. Don't panic that he's too young for grown-up nerd movie lines — Toy Story's "YOU are a child's PLAYTHING!" and The Lion King's "They call me MISTER pig!" will suffice until he's old enough for the real stuff.

Tip #2: Get him obsessed with things. True mark of nerdery is obsession. You know exactly what I'm talking about — math nerd, science nerd, movie nerd . . . It doesn't matter which one, the approach is the same: It's your field. Know it inside and out. Master it. Own it. Get it right.

Tip #2 Corollary: Fandom of some kind is, ultimately, negotiable. While some are considered fairly universal—Star Trek and Star Wars, for instance, and don't mix them up; BIG rookie mistake—none are absolute. It is possible to be a nerd without fandom, because nerdiness at its core is an attitude, a mindset. But if you wish to cultivate a household where the terms "mostly dead" and "flux capaciter" are as familiar as "Mom" and "Dad," then you should cover your bases. Recommendations: "Firefly," "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," and "Angel," for starters. Teaching him the axiom "Joss Whedon is the second coming" would be a plus. Also, steer clear of Twilight at all costs. The additional axiom of "Stephanie Meyer sucked all the awesome out of the vampire genre" would not go amiss.

Tip #3: Raise him on British humor. For some inexplicable reason, not everyone appreciates it, so best to start young. Recommendations: Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and The Princess Bride (honorary British).

Tip #4: Make sure the first songs he learns are useful, like the Animaniacs' Presidents and capital cities songs. No need to pressure him into learning Klingon, but if you've got some instructional tapes or CDs lying around, pop 'em in once in a while. Because, you know, nerds are smart.

Tip #5: When it comes time for him to start attending birthday parties, allow him to choose the gift he will give. It's important for your kid to have an illusion of control. But make sure the wrapping paper he uses is the kind that says on it "Happy Birthday!" in every conceivable language including binary and hexadecimal, and teach him that this is the epitome of cool.

Tip #6: Be aware that he may notice that he is not like the other children. Learn to respond to such ridiculous sentiments as: "But everyone else in my nursery school watches Barney!" with a firm, "Yes, but can any of them carry on a conversation about Heisenberg Compensators with a fully-grown adult?"

Tip #7: Lastly, it is good for your child to have some intersecting points of interest with non-nerds, i.e. the common folk. It is perfectly all right to introduce the kid to sports, but remember — obsession is key. Before he's big enough to play anything, be sure that he knows the history, famous players, records, and names of statistics of his chosen sport. Some nerd elitists may scoff, but in my highly informed opinion, "sports nerd" is a worthy subcategory for a nerd in the modern world.

Well, there you have it. 7 handy-dandy tips and 1 corollary to get you started on growing your very own nerd who will, if all goes right, be unable to get a date to save his life. Good luck to you. Live long and prosper.