KANE'S TREASURE

A love story set in the decadent Restoration era of King Charles II of England. Please comment nicely!

PART ONE

One: The King's Favor

Proud and haughty, wild and naughty,

Mistress to a king,

Louise Marchese was hard to please

In almost everything.

King Charles was tired, and so he hired,

A man called Simon Kane.

This Kane was grim, no warmth in him,

But honest to the core.

Firm and erect, a man to respect,

A soldier scarred by war.

"Puritan friend, to you I send,

This ripe and tempting fruit."

"If you can tame her, you can claim her,

And have my thanks to boot."

Kicking, screaming, temper steaming,

She came to Kane's great hall.

Plates and dishes, loaves and fishes,

She smashed against the wall.

Kane restrained her, quickly trained her,

His orders to obey.

When she took her seat, prepared to eat,

They took the food away!

Louise unfed, was sent to bed,

And cried till slumber came,

Plotting, scheming, even dreaming,

Of hateful Simon Kane.

She vowed to fight, both day and night,

Against her master's rule.

To make him pay, both night and day,

Her vengeance would be cruel!

Two: Battle of Wills

Now morning light was much too bright,

For sleepy-eyed Louise.

But Kane cut short the ways of court,

Her life of royal ease.

Tired and yawning, at day's dawning,

Louise was sent to toil.

Milking, feeding, garden weeding,

Digging in the soil.

Louise could try, with evil eye,

To stare her master down.

But Kane was not an aging sot,

Who wore a royal crown.

So lean and hard, always on guard,

He watched her all day long.

He was not cruel, just calm and cool,

And smart and fast and strong.

Each time she fought, Louise was caught,

And forced to bend a bit.

No use to scowl, or scream and howl,

For Kane feared none of it.

By slow degrees, dark-eyed Louise

Began to lose her fight.

To argue less, or to confess

That Kane was in the right.

A-milking cows or shelling peas,

She watched him all the while.

Though secretly she longed to please,

She never saw him smile.

Three: Kane's Secret

Now late one night Louise broke free,

From slumber deep and sound.

She heard a cry of agony,

Her heart began to pound.

So down the stair with breathless care,

She crept with barefoot stealth.

Down to the room all dark and gloom

Where Simon kept his wealth.

The man was torn with choking tears,

His voice was hoarse and weak.

He didn't know Louise was near,

To shadows he did speak.

"Bessie, Sarah, come back to me,

Before I lose my soul!"

"A devil-woman haunts my sleep,

Her eyes are black as coal."

Louise felt bad, both hurt and sad,

His wife and child were dead.

She longed to speak, but feeling weak,

She crept back up to bed.

Four: Sudden Storm

With troubled heart, and silent frown,

She did her chores next day.

When Kane invited her to town,

She knew not what to say.

Her master showed a different side,

Which she did not expect,

Kane joked and smiled throughout the ride,

But showed her all respect.

Each place they went, his gold was spent,

On finery for Louise,

The dark-eyed girl was in a whirl,

Quite pleased but ill at ease.

"These satin gowns are city wear,"

She said with puzzled frown.

"Far too easy to rip and tear,

So far from London town."

"Tomorrow, back to town you go,"

Kane gestured with his thumb.

"I thought it best to let you know,

When all your work was done."

"That's fine, since you do hate me so!"

Louise began to cry.

"I guess to really win your love,

A woman has to die."

Kane could have struck her, then and there,

His rage was hard to miss.

But then his pent-up fury burst,

And they began to kiss.

His first wife had been meek and mild,

Louise was strong and bold.

Her spirit was untamed and wild,

Pure passion soon took hold.

Five: Big Plans

Afterwards the coach was quiet,

Like the sea after a storm.

Kane felt guilty and contrite

Louise felt snug and warm.

She didn't know his plans had changed,

Until they dined that night.

He said, "A wedding will be arranged,

I think it's only right."

"It's only right?" she echoed him,

Her heart began to crack.

"For honor's sake," his voice was grim,

"There is no going back."

"What passed inside the coach today,

Was shameful to the core.

"I told the king I'd change your ways,

Not use you like a . . ."

"Whore." Proud Louise supplied the word,

Her face was deadly pale.

A life with such a heartless man,

Would be a life in jail.

She'd hoped that she could win his heart,

Despite his Puritan ways.

Now all was lost before the start,

No love was in his gaze.

Six: The Runaway

That very night Louise took flight,

Across the moonlit moor.

She thought she could go back to court,

And live her life once more.

Of course, if Kane had given chase,

He could have caught Louise.

But he believed his own disgrace,

Had forced the girl to flee.

So all he did was pack her things,

And send them to the inn.

Her fancy clothes were waiting there,

When she came walking in.

And Simon sent his coach along,

To speed her on her way.

Louise felt somehow it was wrong,

And yet she could not stay.

Wet and dripping, tears kept slipping,

With every mile that passed.

Finally slowing, no more flowing,

The runaway slept at last.

TO BE CONTINUED . . .