Scene 2

In the kitchen of the D'Arc homestead in Domremy. Despite the caving walls of the tiny hovel, the kitchen is quite clean. Entering from the back door outside, there is a willow-made counter on the left with pots and pans of clay atop it. to the right is the sitting area, a small wooden table where the family gathers.

Enter Pierd, Jacquemin, Jean and Catherine

Pierd and Jean are Joans younger brothers. They both fancy military studies greatly, Pierd with strategy, Jean with swordplay. They both look up to Joan, their older sister, as an inspiration to their aspirations of becoming great soldiers. Despite their masculine obsession with becoming soldiers, they are easy to pick on both in the family and with peers because of their statures. Like Joan, they face discrimination because of something, and as a result they trust each other more than anyone. Jacquemin is Joan's older brother. Fair looking and surprisingly tall, he runs a successful trading venture in the capitol of Lorraine, Metz. At this point, he is engaged to the beautiful Maryse, a young girl from another peasant family. He is a very jealous individual, and loves it when he wins at something, so he'll enjoy bragging about his marriage throughout the play. Catherine is beautiful as well, but she is far less outgoing than anyone in the family. She rarely speaks, but she is willing to help any of her siblings when they need it, which can both help people or hurt them.

PIERD:

My tome, if you can spare it dear brother!

JEAN:

My epee, if you can spare it dear brother!

JACQUEMIN:

Sorry, friends, but you must be married, as I so happily am, to earn your talismans!

PIERD:

What minister would witness such a tragic wedding as yours?

JEAN:

I scoff at your wife, which is a caricature of your unholy selfishness! Cower, like a bat!

Enter Joan.

Joan, as you can tell, is the tragic character of the play. She has a very savage beauty to her; even at age 12, she looks as if she has fought in a thousand battles. She is very tomboyish and outgoing, but also incredibly intelligent and sincere towards those around her. She also possesses a rebellious side, as indicated by her desire to become a soldier even though Father Richter and her own father pressure her to learn "womanly things." Though she is sincere, she is willing to fight for the people she loves, as indicated by this next scene...

JOAN:

What birds call like that, with childish screams of "give, get?"

CATHERINE:

Sister...

JACQUEMIN:

Ah sister! You are but a child. Don't worry yourself, my little toad.

JOAN:

This "toad" needs a lily pad to jump on, and best be careful for it could be you!

To Jean and Pierd

Tell me, young kin, what are the calls that distract me from my books of war?

JEAN:

Most fair sister, your "married" horse of a brother has made off with my blade. If I shall join you in war someday, dear sister, I must have trained.

PIERD:

And I, most fair sister, have lost my books to this "wed" hog. Get them not back, and my tactics will be in vain.

JOAN:

For a "married" hog, or "wed" horse, or however you prefer, brother, you certainly show too much force...or perhaps a strange sort of farce, if I say so myself.

JACQUEMIN:

Ah, listen here sister.

Puts hand on Joan's shoulder

You must understand, I'm older...and did I mention married?

JOAN:

Married to the ground, brother. Here, vous pouvez embrasser la mariee!

Joan fights him to the ground.

JACQUEMIN:

You attack a married man! I am wed soon, fool, scoundrel, off off!

JOAN:

For one with a ring, such a veteran like you would do well to act like one. Return them!

Returns book to Pierd and sword to Jean

JACQUEMIN:

Fine then little chickadees. Enjoy your toys, I have to speak to my wife to be.

Enter Jacques.

Father, these children must receive the proper schooling, or they shall never be happily married like I am!

JACQUES:

Will be, not am. Dear son, I hear the word married from your mouth more than any other. Do well to use it less, for tired it may become.

Exit Jacquemin

Children, if I could have a moment with Joan?

Exit Jean, Pierd and Catherine

Ah, my daughter, I have seen my old wartime tactical books on the playtable in your chamber. Why does it keep happening there?

JOAN:

Father, I've told you already, I find military studies fascinating! The scorpion pinch, the flank...all these wonderful battle tactics! Tell me, how does France lose with such amazing stratagems?

JACQUES:

To answer that...would be breaking my oath as a father, which is to train you for cooking and sewing...girls don't look at tactical books, my daughter.

JOAN:

Father, I have no interest in dolls. I tire of slaving over the cooking pots and I like the robes I possess. A girl I may be, but some cooking wretch I am not! I shan't spend my life focusing on the things I can easily do when there are opportunities in the world that many people, let alone dainty flowers like me, can't. I will be a General in the French armies, and nous frappons those English daisies!

JACQUES:

Joan.

JOAN:

We are France, the eater of worlds!

JACQUES:

Joan?

JOAN:

The blood of the redcoats will match their coats, and both shall seep into the ground.

JACQUES:

Joan!

JOAN:

Sorry, father. I may have been carried awry, but my mind I assure you is in possession of all possible faculties. I shall become a soldier for my kingdom.

JACQUES:

Joan, my love, I must insist you purge that dream! For that is it, a girls dream of greatness. Do you not think all good people have dreams? Do you think any of them come true? I once had dreams too, a successful farm, a wonderful house...but IO had to give up those dreams for new ones. One of those new dreams was you, Joan! A daughter who would treat others well, who learns faster than any child I know! I have that dream because I relinquished my old ones, and you would do well to do the same!

JOAN:

Father, I would consider that an eloquent speech should you not be embarking on a mission assigned by our resident father, Richter.

JACQUES:

Ah, tell me Joan, how did you know?

JOAN:

I heard it in the night. The words of a governor and his father come to my dreams in strange tongues, speaking of England, France, heaven and hell.

Enter Marguerite, resident feline of the D'Arc family.

Marguerite is one of the many animal members of the D'Arc family, but arguably the most important. She represents a sort of animal characterization of Joan. She is known to go missing for days, only to reappear with a mouse and several scratches from fracases with other animals. While the other animals are waited on quite nicely by the members of the D'Arc family, Marguerite enjoys sovereignty and the ability to hunt for herself. Is it any wonder she is Joan's favorite animal?

Hello, my friend? Enjoy the grace of the hunt, have you?

Sets Marguerite on her lap and strokes her.

JACQUES:

I shall leave you...but not this conversation!

JOAN:

Father, you know I love you more than any man could ever love me, but my life is mine, and stones may be thrown, holy water spat and words spewed to stop me! But I press on in the hunt for my sword, and no daisy shall replace it!

Exeunt.