"I wish to extend my sympathies," said Yusuf Harkazi solemnly, "to the victims of the Anaheim massacre, and to their friends and families as well. Such a wanton and gruesome tragedy can never be condoned by civilized persons, and I know I speak for all my IUSP colleagues when I speak of the sorrow it brings me to see our ancient and noble faith, so rich in wisdom and compassion for all peoples, perverted to justify such…"

At this point, the real Yusuf Harkazi entered the room, and cast a sour look upon his televised image. "You've seen it, then," he said.

His wife nodded. "It was very good, I thought," she said. "The best disavowal of extremist violence you've made in nearly a month."

Harkazi groaned wearily, and sank into his armchair. "I didn't have to be a respected American Muslim leader, you know," he said. "Dearborn Construction would surely have taken me, if I hadn't been too proud to know a good thing when I saw one. Ahmad," he said, turning sternly to his son, "if you're ever offered a position with Dearborn Construction, don't be a fool like your father; take it."

"Yes, Abba," said Ahmad dutifully.