Spider's Web
Clever name eh? Okay a forum basically to discuss your own work and others and have an aimless chat about stuff. So get Inspired, everyone's welcome!
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Hunter Victoria
Laurie Halse Anderson is my favorite author. Speak was one of the best books I have ever read...I think it was more the story line than the actual writting but i still love it.

xoxoxo

AngelicScars

11/23/2006 #31
Greenladie
I was absolutely obsessed with Tamora Pierce when I was in middle school, and I still read her books over again all the time. I like the whole woman knight storyline, but I think my favorites were actually the Immortal's series. I loved the idea of her not really being a fighter in a fighter's society and being really in tune with nature.

I'm not really into really dramatic books. Some of the best I've read have been Christopher Moore's books which are amazing, hardly ever make sense and are basically two hundred pages of silliness. His best ones so far have been "Lamb" "Fluke" and "a Dirty Job". Each one is wildly different fromt the other. (Lamb is about the life of Christ, Fluke is about whale researchers in Hawaii, and a Dirty Job is about death. Like, death as a person, not in a general sense.)

Also, despite the fact that I don't like dramatic angsty books most of the time, "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky is probably my all time favorite book. Ever. I've read it about 10 times since discovering it 2 years ago.

I think it's terribly sad that authors are so underappreciated. As an aspiring author myself, I try to always look at the author and try and find something out about them. It's always interesting to find out about an author because it gives you some insight into what kind of a person turned out the story you just read.

12/11/2006 #32
The Egg
Laurie Halse Anderson is my favorite author. Speak was one of the best books I have ever read...I think it was more the story line than the actual writting but i still love it.

I read that book. I found it very annoying.

The lead girl is so pathetic. I didn't like her character AT ALL, she was just too...weak. That's what I describe her as. I mean, the story is rather good, but it's just...ugh.

I want to go to NYC. I know, boring, but it's just one of my dreams...In Europe, I think that somewhere in Ireland would be nice. If it rains a lot, then I'd like England too.

12/11/2006 #33
Greenladie
NYC's okay. Maybe it's because I've lived right outside of it my whole life, but it isn't that exciting to me. I am however exstatic to be going to England AND Ireland this summer. It will be my first time in Europe and I am really excited to go there and get inspired!

I understand what you're talking about. The female characters in Perks aren't terribly strong. No one in that book is terribly strong. That's what I find facinating. That all of these people are broken, and yet they somehow find a way to keep themselves from falling apart. Also, I really enjoy the blatent honesty of Stephen Chbosky's writing. There's something very innocent and naive about it that I really like.

If I could write like four writers I admire, it would probably be

-Stephen Chbosky

-Boris Akunin

-Christopher Marlowe

-A.A. Milne

12/11/2006 #34
The Egg
I've wanted to read 'The Perks of Being a Wallflower' like, ever since it came out. It's really one of those books that a whole lot of people have read, but it still has a sort of 'secret' quality to it.

Books that are set in the city always appeal to me. ESPECIALLY New York City. I mean, if a book is going to be set in a city, of course it's going to be NYC! Why wouldn't it be? I'm pretty sure that people from different countries probably view all cities in the U.S. to be like New York, or maybe LA.

The only 'big city' I've been in is probably Minneapolis, which is probably fourth or fifth in the list of big cities out there.

And as for 'Speak', I didn't mean 'weak' as in 'quiet' or 'shy'.

Wait, what 'Speak' are we talking about here?

12/12/2006 #35
InspiredSpider
Books that are set in the city always appeal to me. ESPECIALLY New York City. I mean, if a book is going to be set in a city, of course it's going to be NYC! Why wouldn't it be? I'm pretty sure that people from different countries probably view all cities in the U.S. to be like New York, or maybe LA.

So true... although I'd like to say I know different lol. It's the same for England, everyone either thinks it's this punk-rock society or high tea with scones or something. I love London, I love living here, it's my personal favourite place to set stories. There's just so much always happening, so much to see, it's great. :)

12/12/2006 #36
Greenladie
I'm not saying NYC isn't exciting. It is. It's a great city and I've had a ton of wonderful experiences growing up near and in it. I'm just saying it's probably more exciting for people who didn't grow up right next to it. It's like anyother hometown: you always want to get away from it growing up, but when you are grown up you always want to go back. There's sentimental value in it.

Perks is one of the most amazing books I've ever read. I discover something new in it everytime I read it. And you're right, there is somewhat of an enigma surrounding it. Despite the fact that tons of people have read it and loved it, every single one of them has come out of it with an entirely different interpretation. Now, that's a sign of a great book if there ever was one, if you ask me.

12/12/2006 #37
Agent Awesome
I freaking LOVE Wicked!

The author is Gregory Maguire, by the way.

I am extremely jealous of all of you who saw the musical, because that is honestly one of my life goals. I would actually prefer it as a movie with the original broadway cast, but I highly doubt that will ever happen. I'm in love with the music either way, though.

Diana Wynne Jones is amazing as well. A Tale of Time City is one of my favorite books.

I have to admit though, I don't really pay that much attention to the actual authors of the books. I guess that's one of the sacrifices you make as a good author: your books become loved by many, but no one really cares who you are (unless they are a stalker haha).

4/21/2007 #38
Agent Awesome
I freaking LOVE Wicked!

The author is Gregory Maguire, by the way.

I am extremely jealous of all of you who saw the musical, because that is honestly one of my life goals. I would actually prefer it as a movie with the original broadway cast, but I highly doubt that will ever happen. I'm in love with the music either way, though.

Diana Wynne Jones is amazing as well. A Tale of Time City is one of my favorite books.

I have to admit though, I don't really pay that much attention to the actual authors of the books. I guess that's one of the sacrifices you make as a good author: your books become loved by many, but no one really cares who you are (unless they are a stalker haha).

4/21/2007 #39
Agent Awesome
Gah double post again! I keep hitting refresh for some stupid reason!

Sorry everyone!

4/21/2007 #40
Bobby McGee
I never pay attention to authors, really. Stephen King and Vladimir Nabakov are the only ones I'll actively seek out; others, I read things and think, "Huh, this reminds me of [title]," then look and see it's the same author.

I read "One Good Turn" by Kate Atkinson, and I'd like to know if she has written any other books.

- Carly

6/30/2007 #41
derisive snort
Certain authors I read tend to draw people to them. Urk, what I mean is, when I read a book that is just fun, or funny or bizzarre or whatever, i don't pay a lot of attention to the author. Howevere if there are really fascinating concepts or ideas (rather than just plot twists) I pay more attention to who they're comming from. Kurt Vonnegut for example. I love him. I can't believ he's dead. I mean his stories are great, but I really like his ideas, to the point where I sometimes read books of his witha penicl and paper so I can take down quotes.
6/30/2007 #42
Bobby McGee
The thing I tend to look for is characters. I tend to find that stories are only as good as the characters in them, but that's probably just my opinion. I've read Kurt Vonnegut, and while it's mostly just rambling as far as I can tell, it's interesting rambling. Like that one guy that published "All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten."

- Bobby

6/30/2007 . Edited 7/20/2007 #43
derisive snort
I agree with you that characters are the most catching part. There arn't many books that I enjoyed when I didn't like the charactors. (I can like them without agreeing with them.)

I get a lot out of Mr. Vonnegut even if he's less than traditional. He's got some pretty memorable charactors.

6/30/2007 #44
Bobby McGee
There arn't many books that I enjoyed when I didn't like the charactors.

I've read like one book where I didn't like the characters but enjoyed it anyway, and that was "Lolita."

I should probably read some Kurt Vonnegut... didn't he write a book about, like, some little girl that died?

- Carly

7/1/2007 #45
derisive snort
Um there is some death in Vonnegut's books. I believe that in Breakfast of Champions someone's wife has commited suicide by eating Drano. THat happened prior to the actuall story though. Slaughterhouse 5 was called "The Childrens Crusaid" but that was mostly refuring to soldiers and victems of war. I haven't read all of his work yet, so I'm not sure which you are refering to. And yes you shoud.

Back to the subjet at hand though:

I think that the anomyty is some of the charm of being a writer. I mean you can affect many people without having them care what bramnd of ciagrrets you smoke and

who your dateing.

7/1/2007 #46
lestatlover
I'm craving a book fix. anyone have any suggestions on what i should read?
7/17/2007 #47
lestatlover
sorry clicked send before i was ready. i liked vampire books (read twilight/new moon) like teen books with tons of drama, and i like a dark twist. old/new I dont care when it was published. i'm running out of books! my fav books are the vampire chronicles by anne rice, just so yeah know. and i always go for the books before the authors
7/17/2007 #48
All Alone With Her Thoughts
I jsut finished Twilight and New Moon as well! Good books, are they not? Not sure if you know, but the third one, Eclipse, is coming out in August. Don't know the exact date, but some time that month.

Have you read anything by Annette Curtis Klause? She writes horror-ish things, vampires, werewolves, etc. Her novel, Blood and Chocolate, was just made into a movie, but the movie was horrible, so don't go out and rent it. Anyhow, it's about werewolves, and a brilliant book. Another of her novels is called The Silver Kiss, and is about vampires. Also brilliant. So for sure, check things out by her, if you haven't already.

7/18/2007 #49
mistariapotter
i dont really like dianne wyne jones, cuz her books are well... kinda slow. i like howls moving castle only cuz it was made into an anime, but the book was really not so good. i dont exactly agree with the author thing, i mean, look at jk rowling, basically, she is in equal status with harry potter. and plus.. she gets the money lol.
7/18/2007 #50
mistariapotter
yea, if u like edward cullen (from twilight) theres a fan club on myspace, and they have a countdown for eclipse
7/18/2007 #51
if you're going downtown
Stephen King and J.K. Rowling are pretty much the only authors I know immediately -- everyone else, I have to ask, "What did s/he write?" I'm bad with names. :\
8/16/2007 #52
a far better fate

I have this thing with authors. I used to not pay attention to them. Now I do. And now I read their blogs, talk to them online, review books for them, add them to my friends on facebook, talk about them constantly.

It's really insane what can happen when you talk to authors...

6/7/2008 #53
Colorful-Fuzzy-HATZ

I have this thing with authors. I used to not pay attention to them. Now I do. And now I read their blogs, talk to them online, review books for them, add them to my friends on facebook, talk about them constantly.

It's really insane what can happen when you talk to authors...

I never realized you could actually talk to authors on facebook or whatever. I'm going to have to try that...

For me, a good book is one that does one of three things: makes me laugh out loud, makes me sit and contemplate issues or situations like I never have before, or inspires me to write my own story. A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray does all of these things for me. I read it and sat there thinking, "wow." Then I bought and read the sequel, Rebel Angels, and got the idea for a story I just started writing.

I really recommend those two books, and the third one which I haven't exactly read yet, but read the plot overview on amazon and just know I'll love. It's a fantasy trilogy that takes place in Victorian England, and is told through the eyes of Gemma Doyle. It's funny, and serious, and magical all at the same time. I love that series.

6/23/2008 #54
Coleer

I agree that it depends upon who the author is, and how much you like the work.

For school we had to research a classic author and I chose Bram Stoker who I admit is an amazing writer (Dracula, Under the Sunset, Dracula's Guest to name a few) and with him it is like you said, Dracula is so famous no one recognizes the others. But they are great.

I also enjoy the writing styles of Stephanie Meyer (Twilight) and Meg Cabot (Mediator, Avalon High, Pants on Fire) and Peter Abrahams (Down the Rabbit Hole, Behind the Curtain)

7/24/2008 #55
Lardlax

"The Rules of Attraction is one of my all time favourite books (and films)! Just thought I'd say that lol"

Yes!

Bret Easton Ellis is AMAZING :D

11/28/2008 . Edited 11/28/2008 #56
luverly.lufy

I really enjoy John Green's novels. His stories seem very real and contain the right amount of funniness and seriousness in them. Usually, in the beginning, they just make you want to crack up and then towards the end you realize how the novel is saying something so much more bigger; so much more important. Sometimes giving us a view on human nature itself. He also doesn't undermine teenager's knowledge. I mean, no offense but sometimes i get the feeling that YA authors would just assume teenagers can't "handle" some things and don't "understand" somethings. I like that he doesn't underestimate us. And it isn't just his books. John Green is also an amazing person. He has a youtube channel with his brother and you feel like he's just like a person you know who you can talk with and not some big time author person that sometimes we misjudge people to be.

So yes. One of my favourite YA authors. :)

12/7/2008 #57
Gloria Jaie

Personally, I think that isn't always necessarily the case. If the book is big, chances are the author will be too. And even if that isn't the case, I think that I would be happy just to be able to share my work with the world, even if my name weren't to become well known. As an aspiring author, I'm just pretty happy with knowing that people get enjoyment out of reading my work. If my name were to become big one day, well, then that's just "the cherry on top" as the saying goes.

7/13/2009 #58
Krystal Rock

I look up good Authors and do a Biography type thing. I did Carolyn Keene, Scott O'Dell, Aprilynne Pike (TAMANI!), and a couple more like Jane Eyre.

10/30/2011 #59
A Fire Rose
Everyone knows who James Patterson is because he is famous for ALL his many books.
3/13/2012 #60
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