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Fractured Illusion

This topic will contain helpful links (and books!) for writing. Whether it's specified or general doesn't matter. Everyone is welcome to post links and titles of books you deem helpful.

Discussions are not meant for this topic. I ask you to take it to the Elements of Writing instead. This serves as a gathering of resources.

All links will be in the second post. All books will be presented in the third post of this topic. The fourth post will be reserved for "Other", such as documentaries or such things that don't belong with the two previously stated categories.

Layout goes like this: We have the title of the website and next to it, the link. With books, we have the title, next to it, the author's name. Under is a description.

Should you give us links, please state under which category it would belong (ie Characters, or invent a new one), and give a brief but helpful summary of what the site/book is about, along with the link/title.

Resources for both stories and poems are welcome!

You bring in the links and books. We edit them into the posts. And so everyone profits!

LINKS

BOOKS

OTHER

What we don't want:

Links to self publishing sites. In other words, links to sites that is like FictionPress. We can all find those on our own. If you have links to accredited publicists we gladly accept, though!

6/2/2008 . Edited 2/21/2009 #1
Fractured Illusion

LINKS

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STORIES:

Advice:

Editor's Pet Peeves - http://www.eharlequin.com/articlepage.html?articleId=1218&chapter=0

An articles that touches upon things that will get your story rejected. Learn to avoid these.

Plot to Punctuation - http://www.plottopunctuation.com/blog

A freelance editor writes about the different aspects of writing. He also has a link for Writing Resources.

Tip of the Day - http://www.writersdigest.com/TipOfTheDay

Many collected tips over time. You may just get an eye opener from one of them.

Writing advice from Caro Clarke - http://www.caroclarke.com

This site has lots of articles on writing fiction that are easy to read and to understand. Some topics covered are pacing, the naming of characters, and character motivations.

Writing Fiction - http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/fiction/

An author that gives out helpful information about writing fiction in his blog.

Writing Pulp Fiction - http://www.paper-dragon.com/1939/dent.html

An outline about how to write a good pulp fiction story.

Characters:

Archetype writing - http://www.archetypewriting.com/

This site deals a lot with psychology and forces you to look deep within your character's mind. A place with many helpful goodies. Do check it out.

Body Language Expert - http://www.bodylanguageexpert.co.uk/

Get some ideas on how your character would communicate with others through body language.

Building Fictional Characters - http://www.charlottedillon.com/characters.html

A pretty solid site that hooks you up with some awesome resources. It includes a list of books to check out, links to naming websites, links about character building, profile sheets, creating wicked villains, memorable heroes and heroines, archetype vs. stereotype, and so much more.

Character Building Workshop - http://www.writersvillage.com/character/index.htm

Includes three tests that outline what sort of archetypal character you have on your hands, descriptions of some archetypes, character poles, and character disorders. Also has a list of the different types of character archetypes and disorders.

Character Trait Chart and Personality Components - http://users.wirefire.com/tritt/tip8.html

Has the usual character worksheet, along with interesting additions. Also offers many character traits you can look at, should you ever feel in doubt what else to add.

Character Names:

A Naming Language - http://www.langmaker.com/ml0102.htm

This site goes very in-depth in creating words in a language you can use to create names with meanings for your characters. You don't really have to read the entire article. Instead, you can just skip down to the tables near the bottom of the webpage.

Baby Names - http://www.babynames.com/

A site with plentiful of names. You can search for the most popular names, and also names for different countries.

Baby Names World - http://www.babynamesworld.com/

Offers basic info, and is easy to browse through.

Behind the Name - http://www.behindthename.com/

"The etymology and history of names". Also contains meanings behind names. Country-name search available.

Character Names - http://www.babynames.com/character-names.php

Searchable baby names and an article for writers with advice about how to name characters.

Character Name Database - http://www.languageisavirus.com/namedatabase/db.cgi?db=default&uid=&view_search=1

Character names that can be searched based on meaning or origin in addition to an alphabetical list.

Fantasy Name Generator - http://rinkworks.com/namegen/

A versatile random name generator geared towards Fantasy, though it can be used for other genres. There is a simple interface for general use/entertainment and an advanced interface. The advanced interface takes a bit of learning to use, but once you know how to use it, you can specify how many syllables in the name, what letter/consonant pair the name starts/ends with, how many vowels you would like, etc.

First Names and What They Mean - http://www.zelo.com/firstnames/index.asp

Allows you to search any name, and it'll bring up the meaning and more.

The Internet Surname Database - http://www.surnamedb.com/

A database full of surnames that provides you with alternate spellings, origins, meaning, and usually a brief history lesson regarding the searched surname.

Meaning of Names - http://www.meaning-of-names.com/

An alphabetical listing of names, their meaning and origin.

Medieval English Surnames - http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/England-Medieval/Surnames.htm

A list of surnames from Medieval England, including noble families.

"Misplaced" Surnames - http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/misplacednamesbyname.htm

A rather lengthy list of surnames including meaning and time period.

Name Generator - http://www.thenamegenerator.com/

A list of first and last names from the Census Bureau. 463 billion name combination searchable by letter and by parts of names.

Popular baby names - http://ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/

More than it sounds: This page tells what name were popular at what years from 1880 and forward. You can also see, if you already have a name, how it ranks on the popularity charts through the years.

Random Name generator - http://www.kleimo.com/random/name.cfm

This site generates a list of names. You pick the gender, how many names it will generate and how obscure they should be. It can also do surnames.

Description:

Descriptive Words - http://www.msgarrettonline.com/descripwords.html

Can be used by anyone who wants to make an imagery and couldn't find the words.

Show, Don't (Just) Tell - http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/creative/showing.htm

Explains the difference between just telling the reader something and actually showing it to them.

Showing and Telling -http://www.anti-shurtugal.com/wordpress/?p=57

Helpful article on understanding the pros and cons of showing and telling.

Dialog:

How to Spice up your Writing with Dialog - http://www.archetypewriting.com/articles/writing/spiceUpWdialogue.htm

Short but to the point on what not to do when writing dialog.

Flaws:

The Fantasy Novelist's Exam - http://www.rinkworks.com/fnovel/

It's basically a quick quiz on your story to see if it's cliched or not.

Limyaael's Fantasy Rants - http://www.livejournal.com/tools/memories.bml?user=limyaael&keyword=Limyaael's+Fantasy+Rants&filter=all

Top notch rants about the flaws of fantasy. Read this not only to learn what not to do, but also for entertainment. Limyaael's rants are far from boring.

Overused Plots in Speculative Fiction - http://www.strangehorizons.com/guidelines/fiction-common.shtml#top

A list of overused plots in speculative fiction compiled by a web magazine with that focus.

Stupid Plot Tricks - http://sff.net/paradise/plottricks.htm

Is all about listing the "stupid plot tricks" regarding certain types of characters (ie, hero, villain, etc). Humorous and true.

Turkey City Lexicon - http://www.sfwa.org/writing/turkeycity.html

It brings up many common flaws, and they are concise and brief while actually delivering a point. Mostly focused at sci-fi, but writing is in all genres so that shouldn't matter much. Read through to find out what your flaws are.

TVTropes - http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HomePage

A pretty good Wiki on cliches, including for the actual books themselves. You can search for books/tv/movies for their 'tropes.' Also, it lists why, and also how/if they have been 'subverted' or 'averted' from the cliché. It encompasses most everything on cliches, if you have any problems with that. It also provides a good laugh.

Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test - http://www.springhole.net/quizzes/marysue.htm

Very good test...at least I (Dexterity) think so.

General:

Absolute Write - http://www.absolutewrite.com/novels/articles1.htm

Has plentiful of articles on subjects such as general writing tips, tips for editing, creativity, etc.

Daily Writing Tips - http://www.dailywritingtips.com/

The title does sound limiting, but this site is so much more than daily writing tips. It also has a list (and explanations) of misused words, features a word of the day, and goes into the areas of spelling and grammar. And much more!

Fiction Factor - http://fictionfactor.com/

This site has a variety of helpful articles on many different subjects in multiple genres of writing. Mainly geared towards getting writers published. Also provides a variety of services.

Free Resources -- http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/06/28/50-free-resources-that-will-improve-your-writing-skills/

A directory of 50 free resources to help you with your writing, organized by category.

For Authors - http://www.forauthors.com/

Has nearly 300 articles regarding writing. Statistically speaking, at least one of them is bound to help you! There are also writing contests wherein you can win money and tips on how to get published.

Holly Lisle - http://hollylisle.com/fm/

Articles, how-to's, workshops. Plentiful of helpful links, basically.

Horror Story Help - http://horror.fictionfactor.com/articles.html

A collection of articles about writing a horror stories, including ones about plot, character development and cliches.

How to Write a Fight Scene - http://community.livejournal.com/start_writing/33910.html, http://community.livejournal.com/start_writing/35924.html, http://community.livejournal.com/start_writing/38697.html

Gives some rules on what to do and not to do when writing a fight scene.

Language is a virus - http://languageisavirus.com/

This site has lots of generators (some silly one and even one for haiku) which might help you on getting rid of that writer's block. It also has articles on brainstorming techniques, visual inspirations, etc.

Nuts and Bolts of College Writing - http://nutsandbolts.washcoll.edu/punctuation.html

Provides a lot of information about writing in general, specifically the process behind writing, writing style, and writing mechanics.

Serendipity - http://nine.frenchboys.net/

A list generator for a variety of different things sorted in the following categories: characters, places, things, stories and travesties.

Seventh Sanctum - http://seventhsanctum.com/

A site full of generators. It has both serious and silly ones, regarding subjects such as combat and "Questionable Anime Attack Generator"

The Writing Gym - http://www.will-ludwigsen.com/gym/index.htm

The Writing Gym is a great website with articles on writing, such as improving prose, grammar technicalities, style, a section on 'business', and 'workouts' to refine any writer's craft.

Workshops -- http://hollylisle.com/fm/Workshops/

Takes up most aspects of writing a story, I think.

Writing-World.com - http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/

A site with general advice about writing. Includes sections on getting started, characters and viewpoints, dialogue, description and setting, story structure, flash fiction, general tips, and getting published.

Writing Steps and Organization Guide - http://mae-jay.deviantart.com/art/Writing-Tips-Organisation-133152185

A short guide regarding writing steps and organization.

Inspiration:

Creative Writing Prompts - http://creativewritingprompts.com/#

Helps you get your creative juices flowing.

The Brainstormer- http://andrewbosley.com/the-brainstormer.html

This site provide you with a randomized list of one object, person, thing, etc., one style, adjectives etc. and a story conflict.

Fire Me Up - http://firemeup.webs.com/

Prompts and other ideas to help you come up with or further develop a plot for your story.

Musicovery - http://musicovery.com/index.php?ct=us

A mood music generator. Want to write something in a dark mood? Then go for it. Musical genres are also available to choose from, to further narrow the results.

One Word - http://www.oneword.com/

One word, 60 seconds to write about it. A small exercise to get some ideas flowing.

PlotBoiler -- http://thebradness.com/plotboiler/

Can't think of anything? Need a bit of inspiration? Try using this generator. At least you'll be amused.

Storybase - http://www.storybase.net/index~nav~home~gro~3~n1~1~n2~3~n3~0~w~none.php

This site is to discover new possibilities, points-of-view and points-of-departure from which your story can unfold. Be sure to read the How To Use before even trying. It will take a few minutes getting the hang of it.

Story Starters - http://thestorystarter.com/

The Story Starter provides 373,067,200 creative ideas and writer prompts for writers of all ages. Use it or abuse it, there is not much difference.

Write or Die! - http://lab.drwicked.com/writeordie.html

For those that suffer from a writer's block, this might help you get some writing discipline!

Writing Productivity Problems - http://www.stanford.edu/dept/helpcenter/Writing.html

A list of issues that writers may have that could decrease their productivity. There are also approaches for overcoming these issues.

WritingFix - http://writingfix.com/index.htm

They don't just have prompts to get your ideas started, they have prompts specialized for right-brained people, and for left-brained people.

Yuni Words of Wisdom - http://www.yuni.com/

Hosts a wide selection of quotes, whether latin, famous. Also has other interesting areas.

Language:

Cliché Finder - http://westegg.com/cliche/

The place to go if you want to use some cliché expressions but feel you have run out of them.

Common Errors in English - http://www.wsu.edu/%7Ebrians/errors/index.html

A comprehensive exposé over the words or phrases that are common errors, such as the title says. Don't be discouraged by the simple layout. It holds many gems.

"Dead Words" - http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/deadwords.htm

A list of overused words and synonyms for them.

OneLook Reverse Dictionary - http://www.onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml

OneLook's reverse dictionary lets you describe a concept and get back a list of words and phrases related to that concept. If this sounds confusing to you, don't worry, they've got lots of examples of exactly what they mean on the first page.

Planning:

A Novel Writing Handout -- http://silveragebooks.myby.co.uk/mag/ns/issues/NS2007.pdf

It's a really extensive worksheet that you could pick out certain parts you want to use or print out the whole thing. It's useful either way. Makes you think about some issues.

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method - http://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/art/snowflake.php

A useful step-by-step of one method of planning a story, good if you have writers block or have written yourself into a hole.

Research:

The Alchemy Website and Virtual Library - http://www.levity.com/alchemy/home.html

A complete online guide to alchemical books, symbols, quotations and discussion groups. You will even find self-study courses on the practice of alchemy.

Crime and Clues - http://www.crimeandclues.com/

Covers the stages of crime investigation, from fingerprints to behavioral evidence.

Crime Spider - http://www.crimespider.com/

Centralized source for crime, police, fire and prosecution information.

Detail Oriented - http://community.livejournal.com/little_details/

LiveJournal site wherein people ask for a specific thing to be cleared up that their own research haven't managed to (ie; what are the best guns for sharpshooting and sniping?) and then the community that knows the answers (or knows where to look) answers.

Encyclopedia Mythica - http://www.pantheon.org/

A site about various info on mythologies all over the world.

How Stuff Works - http://www.howstuffworks.com/

Offers (scientific) explanations from everything between animals to travel, science to history, etc.

Military Jargon - http://www.amyjfetzer.com/jargon.html

Tells you what means what in the military.

Natural Magick by John Baptist Porta - http://www.homepages.tscnet.com/omard1/jportat5.html

Translations of books from the 1500 & 1600s, which allows you to get a good idea of how they viewed magick in that time period.

Research Links for Writers - http://www.charlottedillon.com/ResearchLinks.html

Is only a small part of a larger site, but this is the most helpful page. It contains many links regarding a variety of subjects such as: old and new west, the middle ages, medicine and drugs (now and then), supernatural creatures, civil war, jets, police, law, military, Irish, food and many more.

Timeless Myths - http://www.timelessmyths.com/

This site contains extensive information on mythologies as well as Arthurian Legend. Also has a Bibliography so you can track down the sources yourself. The information presented is extremely reliable, though site navigation can be a bit of a challenge at times and the occasional typo has been known to rear its ugly head. Still actively maintained.

The Twilit Grotto Esoteric Archives - http://www.esotericarchives.com/

A huge online library of magical texts, most of which were first published in 1500s and 1600s. The archives also includes a selection of "grimoires," or spell books.

Writing Realistic Injuries by Leia Fee - http://www.users.totalise.co.uk/%7Eleiafee/ramblings/realistic_injuries.htm

As an author it is your DUTY to make your characters suffer. Some authors make them suffer physically. Here's some tips on how to keep it real. From fainting to burns.

Wolf Song of Alaska - http://www.wolfsongalaska.org/

A website with a lot of helpful information about wolves.

Titles:

The Theory and Practice of Titles - http://www.sfwa.org/bulletin/articles/clough.htm

An essay about titles.

Worldbuilding:

Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions - http://www.sfwa.org/writing/worldbuilding1.htm

If you are ever writing a fantasy and want to make a new kind of world, this is the guide for you. It's extensive and touches many useful topics you need to think of.

The Mythopoet's Manual - http://www.rpgmud.com/WorldBuilding/Mythopoets/tmm.html

About writing multi-cultural fictional settings. Another extensive manual. It is best to read about the topics that concern your story, rather than all of it, for it's a lot. But easy to read.

Other:

Small Blue Printer - http://www.smallblueprinter.com/sbp.html

Allows you to create a blueprint of a house and possibly a garden, which you can use to plan out your characters' living areas.

StumbleUpon - http://www.stumbleupon.com/

Allows you to stumble upon websites based on specific search criteria that you input.

Temptation Blocker - http://sourceforge.net/projects/temptblocker/

Allows people with windows to block certain applications, allowing them to avoid temptation. A 32 character string must be entered to unlock the applications.

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POETRY:

Rhyming:

Online Rhyming Dictionary - http://www.rhymer.com/

It's a rhyming dictionary where you type in the word you want to rhyme with and it spits out a list of words you could use.

Rhyme Zone - http://www.rhymezone.com/

Your one stop for all your rhyming needs. Separates results alphabetically and by syllable. Shows only exact rhymes, and has a whole host of archaic words.

Word Choice:

Descriptive Words -- http://www.msgarrettonline.com/descripwords.html

Can be used by anyone who wants to make an imagery and couldn't find the words.

Inspiration:

One Word - http://www.oneword.com/

One word, 60 seconds to write about it. A small exercise to get some ideas flowing.

Other:

Temptation Blocker - http://sourceforge.net/projects/temptblocker/

Allows people with windows to block certain applications, allowing them to avoid temptation. A 32 character string must be entered to unlock the applications.

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BACK TO THE FIRST POST

6/2/2008 . Edited by simpleplan13, 2/7/2011 #2
Fractured Illusion

BOOKS

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STORIES:

General

The Curious Writer by Bruce Ballenger

A very laid back and goes through exercises to get someone motivated to write.

The Elements of Style by E.B. White and William Strunk Jr. (available online: http://www.amazon.com/Elements-Style-Fourth-William-Strunk/dp/020530902X)

This book helps explain the rules of English writing, specifically grammar, and how they are often violated. It's short, to the point and helpful with writing style.

How to write Damn Good Fiction: Advanced Techniques in Dramatic Storytelling by James N. Frey

Advanced techniques in fiction writing, such as building suspense, creating more interesting characters by quoting acclaimed authors. It is practical, readable, down to earth and concise.

Genre-based books

Writing Bestselling Children's Books by Alexander Gordon Smith

Basically, it cuts the mammoth undertaking of writing for children into 52 not-so-scary sections. Each one filled with knowledge, advice, tips and quotes (from other authors) that deal with all aspects of the novel. Each chapter is about 3-4 pages long, with examples of assumptions and mistakes easily made when writing for children, how to rectify those said mistakes, a little excercise, an inspirational quote from an author, etc.

Specifics

Armed & Dangerous: A Writer´s Guide to Weapons, by Michael Newton

This book was pulblished in 1990, so some information might be out of date, however if your piece is a historical one you will be fine with it

Deadly Doses: A Writer's Guide to Poisons, by Serita Deborah

Deadly Doses is an excellent beginning resource for the writer interested in using poison as an element within a story. It gives a brief history of poisoning, clearly divided chapters (plant based poisons, industrial, medical, etc.), and an easy to read format for each entry. Each poison is listed with a toxicity rating (6 being the highest), form, effects and symptoms, reaction time, antidotes and treatment, case histories, and notes of interest. Because the book has to cover so much, each entry is necessarily brief and many less toxic forms of poison are glossed over or omitted. The author is quite open about this from the start. In addition to the known poisons, the author provides a chapter on how to create an imaginary poison for the sake of your story.

Life In The Middle Ages, by Kathryn Hinds

There are three books (The Castle, The City and The Countryside) which focus on different aspects of medieval life. The volumes open with a good general overview of the period, followed by a host of extensive and well-documented details. The texts provide clear explanations of the people, places, and cultural events of this intriguing time. Interesting sidebars feature recipes, games, and stories.

The City begins with the fundamental question of where power lay in urban areas and looks at how the answer changed over time. The Countryside explains manorialism (the social system in which a lord granted land and protection to peasants in exchange for their labor) and distinguishes it from feudalism. The layout of a medieval village as well as its residents, their work, recreation, and customs are vividly described. In The Castle, the focus is on the people. An explanation of feudalism shows the relationship of the vassal to the lord. The daily life of the many inhabitants from lord and lady to servant are covered in detail along with descriptions of festivities and various forms of entertainment.

Man, Myth & Magic, Published by Marshall Cavendish

This is an illustrated encyclopedia of mythology, religion, and the unknown.

The Writer´s Complete Crime Reference Book, by Martin Roth

Roth deals with all of the major issues involved in crimes. He has a comprehensive list on topics such as motives for homicides, frequently abused drugs, and firearms. The book explores the workings of the police, justice system and investigations. At the end of every chapter you will find a reference list for additional information on the topics covered. Note that this is a reference book--it is not meant to read cover to cover. Browse through the book, highlight, and reread the sections that interest you. This is an essential book for any mystery writer.

Keep in mind that this book might be a bit outdated if you are writing about recent crimes. As the book is not covering the most modern techniques it should be used as an addition.

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POETRY:

General

New Rhyming Dictionary and Poet's Handbook, by Burges Johnson

The first 65 pages or so gives examples of various forms of meter and fixed styles of poetry. It also contains an extensive discussion of rhyming form and technique with examples. The rhyming dictionary section is organized by vowel sounds with the most basic sounds like ATE, IN, OW, EAR listed first and then more complex combination listed toward the end. As a whole, it teaches you versification skills through exposure to rhymes.

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BACK TO THE FIRST POST

6/2/2008 . Edited by simpleplan13, 10/16/2010 #3
Fractured Illusion

OTHER

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STORIES:

None yet. Please make a post if you have something to contribute with!

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POETRY:

Inspiration

Magnetic poetry

It comes with a board that opens up and is magnetic. It also comes with a lot of different small magnets with words and/or letters. You can rearrange them or just use the words to help inspire you. Not so much to write a poem with them, but take some of the words and try to base a poem on them. Sometimes that helps with writer's block. (Wikipedia has more info, if you're curious)

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BACK TO THE FIRST POST

6/2/2008 . Edited 2/21/2009 #4
KnittingKneedle

Planning: http://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/art/snowflake.php

A useful step-by-step of one method of planning a story, good if you have writers block or have written yourself into a hole. It takes a while though, if you're going through all the stages (I've never done the spreadsheet part, so I usually stop at 7).

6/2/2008 #5
Kyllorac

Character Names - Fantasy Name Generator http://rinkworks.com/namegen/

A very versatile random name generator geared towards Fantasy, though it can be used to generate names for other genres. There is a simple interface for general use/entertainment and an advanced interface. The advanced interface takes a bit of learning to use, but once you know how to use it, you can specify how many syllables in the name, what letter/consonant pair the name starts/ends with, how many vowels you would like, etc.

6/2/2008 #6
Distilledfx

A site full of generators - seventhsanctum.com

Its got seriousness and silliness. Everything from Boring name generator (made from census information - snore) to "Questionable Anime Attack Generator". I have used this site sooooooo many times

6/2/2008 #7
dragonflydreamer

I've always used

http://www.babynamesworld.com/

for my names. It's pretty basic info, but it has a lot of names and it's easy to browse through.

EDIT: This would go under Character Names.

6/2/2008 . Edited 6/2/2008 #8
Royal Bliss

The only writing book that I've found semi-useful (that I had to use for class) is called The Curious Writer by Bruce Ballenger...it's very laidback and goes through exercises to get someone motivated to write...and has explanations and all that. Website-wise...

I found this old guy's personal website years ago...turns out he's an author and he gives out helpful information about writing fiction in his blogs: http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/fiction/ Just click around on there.

6/3/2008 #9
Kyllorac

General - Fiction Factor - http://fictionfactor.com/

This site has a variety of helpful articles on many different subjects in multiple genres of writing. Mainly geared towards getting writers published. Also provides a variety of services.

Research - Timeless Myths - http://www.timelessmyths.com/

This site contains extensive information on Classical, Nordic, and Celtic mythologies as well as Arthurian Legend. Also has a Bibliography so you can track down the sources yourself. The information presented on this site is extremely reliable, though site navigation can be a bit of a challenge at times and the occasional typo has been known to rear its ugly head. Still actively maintained.

It's my favorite site to go to for information on myths. n.n

6/3/2008 #10
mate.feed.kill.repeat

If you're looking for a good site to post, read, and review like FictionPress, you could try WritersCafe.org.

In my opinion, FP is easier to use, but WC is more convenient in that you can change the font size, color, face, etc., when you can't on FP. Another difference on WC are the contests and groups. WC also has a point system (I don't fully understand how it works with your writing), messaging through the site and different genres and categories to post under. It's a good site to use if you want a few more reviews and opinions.

6/4/2008 #11
Imalefty

okay, so... i don't really write poetry, but this site COULD be helpful... (and frac asked me to try and get a poetry site... so... XD)

http://www.rhymer.com/ - it's basically a rhyming dictionary where you type in the word you want to rhyme with and it spits out a list of words you could use. XD i used it for the prophecy in the epic story, and it actually helped. ^^;

-Lefty

6/4/2008 #12
simpleplan13

I actually have an other for poetry... the magnetic poetry things. It's kinda silly, but I find it helpful. Not so much to write a poem with them, but take some of the words and try to base a poem on them. Sometimes that helps with writer's block.

6/4/2008 #13
Fractured Illusion

@Mini

What is this "magnetic poetry things"? Please elaborate a bit so I know what I am editing in :p

6/4/2008 #14
Imalefty

they're a set of magnets with random words on them... you basically just put them together in any way you want. :) you can buy them in any bookstore... and probably at places like target or wal-mart, too.

(at least... i'm pretty sure this is what mini is talking about. XD)

-Lefty

6/4/2008 #15
simpleplan13

Ummm you buy them. They are a little magnet board that comes with magnetized words and letters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_Poetry is a description of what it is with some pictures. There are also some one sites that I'm gonna try to explore and see if they're any good.

6/4/2008 #16
Fractured Illusion

Since I know nothing of this, please write me the name and a small summary which I can copy and paste.

6/4/2008 #17
simpleplan13

The name is magnetic poetry. There are different brands and such, but all say magnetic poetry. It comes with a board that opens up and is magnetic. It also comes with a lot of different small magnets with words and/or letters. You can rearrange them or just use the words to help inspire you. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_Poetry is a site that has more information on them.

Is that good Frac?

6/4/2008 #18
Kyllorac

Adivice - Writing advice from Caro Clarke - http://www.caroclarke.com

This site has lots of articles on writing fiction that are easy to read and to understand. Some topics covered are pacing, the naming of characters, and character motivations.

6/7/2008 #19
SympleSymon

Ooh, the one book i really have and that'd helped me a lot so far is Writing Bestselling Children's Books by Alexander Gordon Smith (who wrote the childrens classic the Inventors, if anyone's read that!). It's part of the 52 Brilliant Ideas series of nonfiction books. It's greatness personified...inna book!

6/7/2008 #20
Fractured Illusion

Can you please give a short summary I can copy and paste along with the book title and author?

6/7/2008 #21
SympleSymon

Erm, sure...basically, it cuts the mammoth undertaking of writing for children into 52 not-so-scary sections. each one filled with knowledge, advice, tips and quotes (from other authors) that deal with all aspects of the novel, including.

Finding time, and space, to write.

Tips for making sure you're aiming your story at the right age group.

Ways to make a truly villainous villain (A chappie I always come back to when writing for Syn!)

Believable dialogue.

How to create cracking plot, and keep it moving on.

...yeah, those more or less written from the blurb...but you get the picture. Each chapter is about 3-4 pages long, with examples of assumptions and mistakes easily made when writing for children, how to rectify those said mistakes, a little excercise, an inspirational quote from an author, and directions to another idea for those who don't want to read the book cover-to-cover.

Hope that helps...?

6/7/2008 #22
Johannas mirror

Wel dern if this isn't a wealth of information. ITS LIKE GOLDEN NUGGETS OF KNOWLEDGE!

My favorite things are the little writing prompts on some websites, if you search them, you'll find them...I like doing my best to twist prompts as FAR away from what they were orriginally ment to be...Readers digest, i believe has some really excelent ones.

6/8/2008 #23
Fractured Illusion

@Johanna Rascle

I am not sure what you mean... Is this a site somewhere? Or an "Other"? Where do I put it? What is the title? What is the summary?

6/11/2008 #24
Fractured Illusion

Update:

- Added a link to Character section. Titled "How to create a life"

(I figured I should start doing these update things if I find links on my own, so you guys know if anything has been added. Please let me know if you don't want me to, but do it in the Suggestion topic)

6/13/2008 #25
Arianna Aine

xlibris.com

A publishing company that publishes/advertises/distributes for you for a price, but lets you keep the rights to your work. I heard about them b/c they scour this site for promising authors...I was one of the ones they emailed. Don't let the cost get you down. If you are serious, this is a great deal.

Yes, they are real. I've read some of their books.

6/14/2008 #26
Chidori Nadare

languageisavirus.com

This site has lots of generators (some silly one and even one for haiku) which might help you on getting rid of that writer's block (it worked for me). It also has articles on brainstorming techniques, visual inspirations, etc.

6/23/2008 #27
clarity-eatworld

Character name:

www.zelo.com - allows you to search any name, and it'll bring up the meaning and more...

Titles

http://www.sfwa.org/bulletin/articles/clough.htm - The Theory and Practice of Titles is a rather short essay, discussing ways to title your story.

8/7/2008 #28
Kyllorac

Character Name:

A Naming Language - http://www.langmaker.com/ml0102.htm

This site goes very in-depth in creating words in a language you can use to create names with meanings for your characters. You don't really have to read the entire article. Instead, you can just skip down to the tables near the bottom of the webpage.

8/15/2008 #29
Fractured Illusion

Hey, do you guys have any good poetry links? That section is greatly ignored here :p

9/22/2008 #30
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