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lookingwest

Motorcyles... well I've never actually driven one but I've rode passenger often enough. It gets a bit boring, you have to sway scarily close to the ground around tight corners, and eventually your bum starts to really hurt.

I've been passenger on two--one was a crotch rocket...and the other was normal enough. But they were short rides, so I didn't get the bum hurting thing. This whole shindig is going to go down in Kit's POV though, so I don't have to worry about what it feels like to drive, haha

Picking a motorcycle would be fun! Maybe you could start another poll up :p I'd go for something really fast, Ducati, they're the fast ones right?

Yeah, I'll have to go with a fast one...the funny thing is, at the arrangement I have, I'll need two of them (Kit can't shift OR drive a motorcycle), and Jude won't be able to drive. B/C he's the ammo, so to speak...

So erm...arrangement is, the girls are going to be driving, XD That actually happened on accident :/

Wait--this goes back to Box Seat advice though!

Does Charlotte being able to drive a motorcycle end up under the "You didn't tell me your character could do that, you idiot" category? :S I didn't think about it until right now...craptards...

7/2/2010 #61
xenolith

That's what's so cool about the Matrix, when Trinity didn't know how to fly a helicopter she just rung whatsisface up and they loaded a programe and then, pow, she was off!

Don't know if that helped.

It wouldn't be weird if Charlotte knew how to ride a motorcyle, I think. She seems real badass, I bet she could do anything. Girl Power! Ahem... XD

7/2/2010 #62
lookingwest

It wouldn't be weird if Charlotte knew how to ride a motorcyle, I think. She seems real badass, I bet she could do anything. Girl Power! Ahem... XD

Good! I was hoping her general bad-ass-ness would get me away with it :D

7/2/2010 #63
C. Tattiana H-H

Does Charlotte being able to drive a motorcycle end up under the "You didn't tell me your character could do that, you idiot" category? :S I didn't think about it until right now...craptards...

Naw, you're fine. If she knew how to do crazy motorcycle tricks that saved their necks more than once then I'd be a annoyed. It just has to seem realistic. Someone being able to drive a motorcycle is realistic. Question though, does she have past experience driving a motorcycle? If not, perhaps she could have a bit of steering trouble in the beginning to make it more realistic.

7/3/2010 #64
xenolith

DOMINATED! Yeah!

What thread is this... box seats... oh, I'm so mature. Speaking of INSIWB, I'm looking forward to that bike scene!

7/6/2010 #65
lookingwest

Naw, you're fine. If she knew how to do crazy motorcycle tricks that saved their necks more than once then I'd be a annoyed. It just has to seem realistic. Someone being able to drive a motorcycle is realistic. Question though, does she have past experience driving a motorcycle? If not, perhaps she could have a bit of steering trouble in the beginning to make it more realistic.

Oh man, I forgot about that question--thank you! YAY! Realistic! My problem is that apparently it's difficult to drive a motorcycle if you're under a certain amount of weight. I had Char at about 140...Eddy thinner though--we'll see, I like the idea about the steering trouble though, that should be good fun! And what better way to give Kit another opportunity to throw up? :D

7/6/2010 #66
C. Tattiana H-H

Oh no, we've gone OT in the wisdom thread. XD

DOMINATED! Yeah!

Ha-ha, what did you dominate? That was pretty awesome, actually. I read it and was like, "YEAH! Dominate!" Then I realized I didn't know what I was so pumped up about.

7/7/2010 #67
dx713

problem is that apparently it's difficult to drive a motorcycle if you're under a certain amount of weight. I had Char at about 140...Eddy thinner though

I don't think it's that problematic. I was around 140 when younger and was perfectly fine through my motorcycle driving course (Yamaha 600) - except being very bad at body control, but that's not limited to motorcycle. Somoeone who was taking lessons with me was even lighter and totally pwned the course, through experience with mountain biking and trial. Unless the motorcycle you're talking about is really heavy, or you want to drive very hard, racing style, that shouldn't be a problem. Understanding the controls and how to change gears might be one, if she never did it before.

I've heard (and noticed, as I'm quite short) that size can be more a problem. On a big motorcycle, or a trail-shaped one, you can end with just the end of your toes touching the road when you stop, or only on one side. If you add to that a passenger behind you leaning the wrong way, or a slippery pavement, or a pothole, you can easily end a stop with the bike on your foot. (And heavy bikes are b*** to get back up when they're lying down). Low rider / custom style bikes are much more comfortable on that department.

Usual problems for beginners (I don't know how much experience you want Charlotte to have) are low speed equilibrium / manoeuvrability (it's much easier once you've accelerated a bit), and high speed steering (having to push the handle on the inside of the turn is quite of counter-intuitive at first + the fact that you tend to intuitively steer where you look, so you don't want to look at the obstacle you're trying to avoid). And the classical being surprised by the power, and having the bike leaving you behind on your first start, of course, is always great source of fun.

7/11/2010 #68
Jealous Rage

Oh man, I just realized I don't get alerts from this topic haha. I've never posted in here before haha.

Oh man, I forgot about that question--thank you! YAY! Realistic! My problem is that apparently it's difficult to drive a motorcycle if you're under a certain amount of weight. I had Char at about 140...Eddy thinner though--we'll see, I like the idea about the steering trouble though, that should be good fun! And what better way to give Kit another opportunity to throw up? :DWeight shouldn't be a problem for anyone who has even a little experience riding motorcyles; it's all about height. Anyone under 5'2" is gonna have some trouble with the bigger bikes. Legally, you can't even drive a bike unless you can "flat foot" it, which means you have to be able to plant your entire foot on the ground when not moving forward; no tip-toes haha. Past a certain height, say around 5'4", there shouldn't be any problems, unless the person weighs a ridiculously weight (say under 80 lbs). I don't ride very often, but I do occasionally, and I've ridden a couple times with a female friend who is about 5'5" and maybe 115-120 lbs. Her bike is pretty big and she never has any problems with it. Actually, she handles it better than I do, and I'm 5'11" and 220 lbs. Thats probably just experience though haha.

7/11/2010 . Edited 7/11/2010 #69
PapaMike

Things you should do to avoid making Papa facepalm.

1. Think it through- As peopek already know, my favourite genres are fantasy and sci-fi, however nothing is more annoying then a weak world. The thing about fantasy and sci-fi is that you set up you're own convention and laws, they don't have to be restricted to the laws of physic, but they do have to work on a logic of their own. The best fantasy and sci-fi are the ones where the author has thought about the world and why it is the way it is in advance. If you are unsure as to what that means then here are a few simple questions to help you along the way...

- What are the laws of physics in this world, do they apply to everyone? If not, why not?

- What are the ruling species, how did they evolve to the top of the food chain?

- What is their society like? Why has it evolved this way?

- Will there be religion? In every society on earth you can't escape it, so does that apply to your world? If not why not? If yes then what are the stories, the rituals and the structures?

- Swear words, does the world have it's own blasphemes and curses based on their own taboos?

- What happens when these rules are broken, who enforces them? Why?

- And most important of all, what do your characters do when they are not out changing/saving the world? What do they play, do they play at all? What are they like when you are not writing them?

2. Never be afraid of short sentences- Yes short sentences can make a paragraph seem abrupt, but over use of commas is just ridiculous. As other people have said, it's not good to have to use an inhaler just so you can regain your breath, likewise too many commas to break up overly long sentences just makes the reading pace doddery. A good author understands the importance of editing, a great author can strike a balance so subtle that you will never even notice the punctuation. It will just have a natural flow.

3. Your audience aren't idiots- Try not to repeat what you have already said, this is something I constantly battle, and may never get the hang of. Your audience may not be as well versed in your story as you are, but they are usually surprising clever, treat them as such. Don't feel the need to explain every little detail. Think back on the books that you have really enjoyed in the past, chances are they made you think about what was going on. They didn't answer every question you had as each question was prevented.

4. My Grandfather used to say 'You missed a good opportunity of saying nothing.'- Don't forget that humans communicate non verbally 87% of the time, out of communication with words only 5% of it is what you actually say, the rest is all in the connotation. If you are struggling writing dialogue, then maybe there doesn't need to be any. Work out what your characters body language is like, and who can read it accurately. If it is read inaccurately then what effect does that have? The world is full of communication errors, why do fictional characters, partners in particular, always get it right?

5. Take your time- I can't count the amount of good stories I have read, particularly over the internet, where I have been deeply disappointed with the ending. If you are bored with the story then it shows. Rushed endings are my biggest pet peeve, if you feel yourself falling into this trap STOP WRITING! You are doing more harm then good, and your tale will be better served if you were to but down the keyboard and come back to it in a few hours, or even a few days.

That's it really, I'm sure there are more things, but those are the check lists for when I am writing a story. I only wish I was better at taking my own advice.

8/3/2010 #70
C. Tattiana H-H

Yes, Mama Smurf!

I'm glad to see another epic list of peeves and advice. :3

Will there be religion? In every society on earth you can't escape it, so does that apply to your world? If not why not? If yes then what are the stories, the rituals and the structures?

I think all of your questions are incredibly helpful and things writers should answer before writing. Unfortunately, I forgot about a lot of these things before I started writing Shadows, which is the reason why I've had to put my writing on hold for a little while. This question in particular I'm quite fond of, though. In Shadows, two kingdoms have religion while the other two don't. Why? Well, two out of the four kingdoms are dominated by magic wielding persons and shapeshifters. They have necromancers and other "mancers" that are in touch with the other realms, so they know what to expect when they die. Because of this, they don't fear death and don't trouble themselves with religion. I'm still working out the details of a lot of this, but basically half my world doesn't have religion because heaven and hell is not the same sort of heaven and hell we believe in in our reality.

I think this part of writing is particularly fun, and I'd definitely like to see more creativity in this area of world building.

Swear words, does the world have it's own blasphemes and curses based on their own taboos?

I'm still struggling with this one, actually; primarily because I had overlooked the language aspect of my four cultures. I'm trying to tweak and remedy this as we speak, but I'm a horror at creating non-hilarious swear words that are taken seriously. Taboos are definitely something I'm trying to think of, but blasphemes not so much; I think my religious kingdoms will hold similar ideals to modern day Christianity and Islam.

What happens when these rules are broken, who enforces them? Why?

I grinned when I read this one because this is the one I have the most fun with. In my shapeshifting society, the rules are enforced by various peoples, some elected, some just so full of themselves they feel the need to enforce laws for "the greater good". I have so much fun with this part because I don't think my readers will be expecting the personalities of the ruling heads of the kingdom. I definitely think this is something writers could be more creative with, as well.

And most important of all, what do your characters do when they are not out changing/saving the world? What do they play, do they play at all? What are they like when you are not writing them?

Guilty! SO guilty. I forgot about this one and this is the major reason I've stopped writing recently. I have two characters living in a huge castle with no help. Honestly, Liana, you're smarter than that! XD It's easy enough to fix, but will take some careful consideration since there's more to the castle than meets the eye, and no one's supposed to find out that the two characters are sorcerers. Le sigh. The ups and downs of story writing. I'm glad that you brought this up, though; it's definitely something that needs extensive consideration to make characters more realistic.

Points 2 and 3

Hear the woman, hear the woman! I feel quite strongly about point three, actually; but I'll restrain myself and just nod my approval.

Point 4

I have some trouble with this one. I incorporate a lot of non-verbal body language, but I use eye communicate more often than I like (I just realized this as I was going through and editing last week). I always have my characters' eyes flash or become hooded, or brighten or narrow or glow or whatevertheheck! Too much! I think I need to become more creative with this aspect of writing, so if anyone has any other ones they'd like to throw out there for my future consideration and incorporation, it would be greatly appreciated.

The basic ones that I can think of right now are: picking at face, rubbing feet, cleaning nails, scratching arm, nodding at appropriate places, focusing intently on person speaking, shifting feet, shrugging, frowning. Intimidating someone: coiled body tension, direct-hostile eye contact, lowering voice.

Other than that, I'm a little strapped for new ways of conveying body language. =/

Point 5

I haven't encountered that depressing situation yet, but another reason I stopped writing was because I was a little bored with my story. Only bored because I don't want to write about certain characters, but the story would take a serious nose-dive if I didn't write about them. Taking time away from your story to edit, listen to critiques, reread old reviews and whatnot, is crucial to my writing process. I need to take the time to collect my thoughts, solidify the building blocks of my world, and improve the story as a whole before I move on. I've cranked out a few chapters that I rushed through; and the readers could tell! I feel terribly about that, but sometimes we just have to get through writing something to get it over with. The important thing is to go back and tweak, and try not to do that all the time.

Well, I think all of your points are incredibly valuable and I thank you for sharing them! I always love to hear about other writers' peeves and whatnot. :D

8/3/2010 #71
PapaMike

Unfortunately, I forgot about a lot of these things before I started writing Shadows, which is the reason why I've had to put my writing on hold for a little while.

I think that's very brave thing to do, when you find a hole in it, to stop until you fix it, I usually rush ahead and go it'll be okay, which is why I run into trouble. Now, before I start anything, any new chapter, I try and look at it at all angles.

Why? Well, two out of the four kingdoms are dominated by magic wielding persons and shapeshifters. They have necromancers and other "mancers" that are in touch with the other realms, so they know what to expect when they die. Because of this, they don't fear death and don't trouble themselves with religion. I'm still working out the details of a lot of this, but basically half my world doesn't have religion because heaven and hell is not the same sort of heaven and hell we believe in in our reality.

That's a good idea, because one of the main reasons sociologist believe religion exists is because a fear of death and/or the unexplained. It might also be worth taking a look at France and how they have separated religion and state. People still practice religion in private, but there is none taught in schools or anything like that. They take the separation very seriously, because around the time of the second world war, there was a trial, and a man called Draffus was used as a scapegoat. he was executed and it is thought that one of the contributing factors was that he was Jewish. Whether or not it is true, ever since, the separation of state affairs and personal beliefs have been strictly adhered to, it's part of the culture now. So ideas like that might also be worth looking at if you haven't worked out the details.

I grinned when I read this one because this is the one I have the most fun with. In my shapeshifting society, the rules are enforced by various peoples, some elected, some just so full of themselves they feel the need to enforce laws for "the greater good". I have so much fun with this part because I don't think my readers will be expecting the personalities of the ruling heads of the kingdom. I definitely think this is something writers could be more creative with, as well.

I completely agree, this is my favourite part too, especially since authority figures are usually the bad guys, and everyone loves a good villain. But I like the thought of corruption as well as bizarre twists in the hierarchy, at heart I am deeply in love with Gothic fiction, and the ruling classes in Avalon reflect that sense of moral decay. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

The basic ones that I can think of right now are: picking at face, rubbing feet, cleaning nails, scratching arm, nodding at appropriate places, focusing intently on person speaking, shifting feet, shrugging, frowning. Intimidating someone: coiled body tension, direct-hostile eye contact, lowering voice.

Other than that, I'm a little strapped for new ways of conveying body language. =/

You know more about body language then you think, every one does. One thing I have noticed studying drama is that humans are very receptive to picking up on non-verbal cus, but very rarely do people realise they're doing it, we all do it as babies, you know the way that kids can always tell when you're sad. Pets too. A good way to boost your awareness of this is to people watch, and every time you look at a person ask yourself, 'what are they feeling?' then look at the way they hold themselves. It's not just about the gestures, but posture, how are they sitting, what is they're head and arms and legs doing. Are they curled in to protect their middle because they are feeling vulnerable. Are they sitting openly with their feet planted firmly on the floor, they must feel comfortable. Do they emphasise their vulnerable points such as crotch, stomach and pulse points, then they are trying to assert dominance. Do they have their hands in their pockets while they are doing this? Then it must be false confidence.

Like animals we have evolved to read the emotions of our pack, and although we consider ourselves intellectual beings, often our body language is primal, it's hard to fake instinct after all. It always helps me to remember that everyone is trying to work out where they fit in the power plays. It's like watching a wolf pack sometimes.

I haven't encountered that depressing situation yet, but another reason I stopped writing was because I was a little bored with my story. Only bored because I don't want to write about certain characters, but the story would take a serious nose-dive if I didn't write about them. Taking time away from your story to edit, listen to critiques, reread old reviews and whatnot, is crucial to my writing process.

This is something that I have only really learnt since I've started posting here again, and actively seeking help with my work, I used to just forge ahead and get all caught up, but I have learn that editing is invaluable.

8/3/2010 #72
sophiesix

Do they have their hands in their pockets while they are doing this? Then it must be false confidence.

lol, thats the fun though, you can play around with interpretations. like me, i might make that because he's confident but not wanting to look arrogant, not wanting to obviuosly throw his weight around, so he hides some of his power a little more discretely but putting his hands away. or, he might have cold hands. or dirty hands. or scarred hands. or be holding a gun. lol, the possibilities...

Rushed endings are my biggest pet peeveargh! endings are my bugbear! i was just trying to polish my WCC piece a bit and finding the same old problem. i have no idea how to make an ending seem ending-y. i can appreciate when others do it, like Katherine Mansfield, who manages to do it even without resolving the issues she's raised. but gah! i reread mine and KNOW it just doesn't feel solid enough. there's an art to the denouement that i just aint got (sorry readers!)

8/3/2010 #73
PapaMike

In case anyone is stuck with writer's block, I am going to share my not so top secret list of writing prompts.

feel free to add any if you have some, or if you have other ways of beating that foul beast that preys on this community with such relish.

http://pappamike.livejournal.com/4295.html

Hope this helps someone :)

8/5/2010 #74
PapaMike

Another pet peeve, if it hasn't already been mentioned is the overuse of dialogue. Just reading a story where all the dialogue made it so clumsy, and the worst of it is, I am now going over my short-story realising I have made the same mistakes. Will have to fix that before posting. *sigh*

8/10/2010 #75
RisanF

I think an important thing to keep in mind is context. A lot of writers are obsessing over adverbs in of themselves, but they're not thinking about the story itself. If you use an adverb to quickly describe a character's action in one sentence, but you've also given us a clear view of the character. You don't need to use eight words when one will do, just to pay tribute to an arbitrary writing rule.

The point of "Show don't Tell" is to get writers to think about context, about how the character's actions and words are adding up to a complete picture. If you just take that to mean "get rid of all adverbs", then you're probably still not thinking about context. You can't just tack every bit of advice you hear about writing onto your story, because the advice is not all-inclusive.

8/11/2010 #76
PapaMike

Wise words indeed :D You're right of course, everyone has their own problems and bad habits, I suppose it's about knowing your good and bad points as a story-teller. The thing I find funny, is that the little annoying nitpicks I have with some people's work, is usually the same things I don't like about my own.

One thing I find really helpful though is to step back occasionally and focus on the good. Sometimes we can spend so much time worrying about what is wrong with a piece that the negatives inflate and we diminish the positives.

8/11/2010 #77
sophiesix

True, RisanF and PM! So easy t focus on teh negatives and it makes it hard to be objective about the real value of teh piece as a whole.

8/11/2010 #78
xenolith

That's when you do a quick edit, reread it and leave it till morning. Then you wake up refreshed and ready to work on the things that you missed yesterday.

8/11/2010 #79
C. Tattiana H-H

One thing I find really helpful though is to step back occasionally and focus on the good. Sometimes we can spend so much time worrying about what is wrong with a piece that the negatives inflate and we diminish the positives.

Hear the woman, hear the woman! I encountered that with Shadows, actually. I've just recently been bouncing back from beating (alliteration, like whoa) myself up about Shadows. I think it's important, just as Mama Smurf said, to step back and look at the good. By focusing on the positive aspects of one's writing, I find it can rejuvenate the spirits and inspire one to write better or even simply more. Excellent points here.

That's when you do a quick edit, reread it and leave it till morning. Then you wake up refreshed and ready to work on the things that you missed yesterday.

And this, as well. I think taking a short break from editing--i.e. waiting a day or so--and then coming back to it, one isn't so close to the piece and can edit more thoroughly and with perhaps a deeper insight.

Man, I love this thread.

9/10/2010 #80
Jealous Rage

Yes, I agree. In fact, I took a break for several months (not really recommended haha) before going over what I had originally written as the third chapter of South Of Heaven. When I went back, I found that not only did I have many mistakes in it, I actually just hated it all. So I started over and am pretty pleased with what I came up with on the second try. That is all.

9/10/2010 #81
C. Tattiana H-H

Oh, gawd, yeah. I'm looking over Shadows again (much with Sophie's help) and I cringe at most of it. It needs so much work.

In short: breaks are good. :3

9/10/2010 #82
SilverBluu

Hey Globers, haven't posted in a while. Still exploring the different parts of this forum. I guess I'll try my hand at giving out some advice. Not sure if anyone's posted on this subject already.

Painting the Mona Lisa (and bringing her to life):

A scene is not just made of images or visual input, we do indeed have 5 senses. I often get the feeling that the other 4 get left behind in the dust because sight is our primary information processing system. However, I believe that including the other senses will bring the scene to life. And I like to ask these questions when creating a setting:

Beyond the color of the object, how about texture? Is it smooth? grainy? rough and overused? These can sometimes give a history of the object. eg: The rough bark on the tree gave way to smooth thin lines; like ice-skaters in the dark who carved heart-shapes in ice.

Is there an appropriate smell that goes well in this scene? If its in a dark alley, what does the dumpster smell like? If you're dancing with a lady, what does her perfume smell like? eg: As I leaned closer, the smell of apricot traced lines through the folds in her hair.

Taste is an interesting one. I see a decent amount of the rust-flavor of blood, but there's a decent amount of leverage/ poetic license you can take with any of these senses. eg: The oasis tasted like liquid gold, or kissing the lips of the goddess of life.

Sound is secondary to sight, and most of the time the attention to this sense is fairly well distributed. I like to ask myself little riddles to get sound descriptions. eg: What is the sound of snow? Falling snow sounds like muffled silence. Fallen snow sounds like echoed stillness.

Hope this was helpful, happy painting.

9/30/2010 #83
Tawny Owl

Yes, I find that breaks from what I'm writing helps see it a fresh. You get to see all the really naff stuff. Sometimes you realise how good bits of it are worth saving too. Does anyone else have moments when there's a line that is so good you can't believe you wrote it? (It doesn't happen very often, but when it does it's a good feeling).

I like books and things that incorporate scents too but I'm not sure i do it myself very often. So thanks, for that post. It's made me think about it more. I love Alice Hoffman's Practical Magic, that's very sensory. She's always including scents and sounds.

10/2/2010 #84
MidNight The Magnificent
Oh yes, taking breaks generally helps a lot. I've been taking a rather long, extended, (and no-end-in-sight sorta) break with my work on FictionPress lately. Most recently did an angsty type of poem for here[actually, what am I saying. I didn't plan that. I was just angry at the parents/prison wardens giving me the third degree AGAIN for no good reason and the poem just happened. It is bad, and I deserve all the abuse I'm going to get from it in my reviews.], but I'm not happy with it at all. Me thinks I should stick with my first choice of a "day"/nightclub side job as a stand-up. First job being the animation career that I am working so hard studying my a*s off for, of course.
10/2/2010 #85
xenolith

Thanks for your post, Silver. Great thing to point out. In your reviews I know you're always reminding me about the other senses, and I really appreciate it!

So thanks, for that post. It's made me think about it more. I love Alice Hoffman's Practical Magic, that's very sensory.

zomg, that's a book!? I love the movie XD

Oh yes, taking breaks generally helps a lot. I've been taking a rather long, extended, (and no-end-in-sight sorta) break with my work on FictionPress lately.

Me too haha. But don't worry about it. And angst is good! Nothing wrong with getting your feelings out there.

10/3/2010 #86
MidNight The Magnificent
No. Angst is not good for me. I am not a whiny stupid teenager anymore, and I shouldn't "angst" anymore. I don't know. Maybe it's just me, but I'm not used to the feeling of being upset. I always get over stuff in my life quickly, so this shouldnt be any different. I just don't know why I am so affected, this time. I am a crazy happy person, and I just hate the situation my life is, at this moment.
10/4/2010 #87
C. Tattiana H-H

Great thing to point out. In your reviews I know you're always reminding me about the other senses, and I really appreciate it!

Yes, I must commend Silver for being the king at this. He's constantly reminding me about the other senses, as well, and although it took a while, I think I'm doing a better job at incorporating them. Employing the use of all five senses (or six, depending on your genre) does wonders for bringing a story to life. So, thanks, Silver! :D

10/5/2010 . Edited 10/5/2010 #88
A. Gray

So I thought I might have a bit of a go at this, but honestly most the stuff stated here was like a slap to the face. (omg am I doing that?) I know that I have come a long way since I began, but i also understand I have a long way to go. These are some of the things i have picked up on being a beta on fanfiction.

Back round: I have read several stories where something happens, and the main character reacts, and i am left going ".... what?" Typically the next chapter of two the author explains why the character acted as they did in an authors note. So: Not everyone know the characters like you do. We only know what you tell us so TELL US! Also they do something and add filler saying this is why. No don't just make stuff up to fit why they did what you want them to. Either have them do what they would or change them to be the person that would do it to begin with.

Development: I have read several stories where the main character goes through no development what so ever, and comes out in the ends the same as they went in. If you are writing about something that will have no effect on the main character than maybe you should rethink it. If the character is just that dull and flat, most people won't identify with them and it will fail.

Flaws: No main character will ever be completely perfect, and if you write one it will fail. The reader needs to see flaws in the persona of the person (low self esteem, rage issues, control freak). Readers like to identify with the main character, and when they do they get that much more into the story.

Moderation: Said is awesome, but they discourage it at a young age for a reason. I have read where everything is he said she said even in the case of questions. Too much of a good thing is bad. Moderation is key! Also super action packed stuff will likely leave the reader confused and overwelmed. Every story needs downtime.

Switcheroo: Something I have done only once before, but I love it. You get to the end of the story, and then BAM! The hero/heroine is the bad guy and the villian is the good guy. Once again only use in moderation or it become predictable. Take set up and little hints that are dropped along the way like bread crumbs.

You are them!: Put yourself in every characters shoes.

I think that's it...

-AJ

10/6/2010 #89
xenolith

oooh nice point about flaws! and character development. especially important in shorts, if they don't change and nothing happens then what's the point? though, this is easier said than done. I often find there's so much to remember when writing that it can become a little overwhelming. can anyone else relate to this?

anyway, thanks for contributing AJ!

10/7/2010 #90
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